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Bohol Earthquake-Induced Landslide Hazard Map.jpg
Bohol Earthquake-Induced Landslide Hazard Map.jpg
The Earthquake-Induced Landslide Hazard Map shows areas’ susceptibility to landslide caused by earthquakes. Hazard classifications are: High Susceptibility, Moderate Susceptibility, Moderate Susceptibility, Low Susceptibility, Not Susceptible, and, Possible landslide depositional/affected zone. The susceptibility is determined by simulating the largest possible earthquake magnitude occurring in the area. Landslide potentials were calculated using: A.) the computed Factor of Safety (FoS); B.) simulated ground shaking by Fukushima and Tanaka; and, C.) critical acceleration of slope by Newark methods. The result shows the possible landslide initiation zones at varying degrees, i.e., high, moderate and low. Hatchured areas show the possible depositional extent of land slide materials and is considered part of the areas that may be affected by landslides.The Earthquake-Induced Landslide Hazard Map is acquired in JPG from the Hazards Mapping and Assessment for Effective Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (READY) Project through the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PhIVolcS). Information sources are as follows: Hazard Data is generated by PhIVolcS, Administrative Boundaries are from National Statistics Office (NSO) 2000, and Topographic Map 1:50,000 scale from National Mapping Resource and Information Authority (NAMRIA).Available in JPG and PDF, this map may be downloaded and used for free provided that: a.) no alterations are made to the map; b.) proper citations be referred to the sources mentioned above; and, c.) all logos appearing on the map should also appear on your document.
Bohol Ground Rupture Hazard Map.jpg
Bohol Ground Rupture Hazard Map.jpg
The Ground Rupture Hazard map shows the location of the active faults of Bohol. Recommended minimum buffer zone is at least 5 meters as reckoned from both sides of the active fault trace or from the edge of the deformation zone.Ground rupture is a visible breaking and displacement of the Earth’s surface along the trace of the fault, which may be the order of several meters in the case of major earthquakes. Ground rupture is a major risk for large engineering structures such as dams, bridges and nuclear power stations and requires careful mapping of existing faults to identify any which are likely to break the ground surface within the life of the structure. (Wikipedia)The ground rupture data is from the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PhIVolcS), 2008. Administrative boundary is from the national Statistics Office (NSO), 2000. The Topographic Map 1:50,000 scale is from the National Mapping and Resource Information Authority (NAMRIA). The Ground Rupture Hazard Map is acquired from the Hazards Mapping and assessment for Effective Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (READY) Project through PhIVolcS.Available in JPG and PDF, this map may be downloaded and used for free provided that: a.) no alterations are made to the map; b.) proper citations be referred to the sources mentioned above; and, c.) all logos appearing on the map should also appear on your document.
Bohol Ground Shaking Hazard Map.jpg
Bohol Ground Shaking Hazard Map.jpg
The Ground Shaking Hazard shows areas categorized in potential intensities of ground shaking during an earthquake. The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PhIVolcS) categorizes this into: Lower than Intensity VI, Intensity VI, Intensity VII, and, Intensity VIII and above. The scale unit is in PhIVolcs Earthquake Intensity Scale (PEIS), a measure of how an earthquake felt in a certain locality or area. It is based on relative effect to people, structures, and objects in the surroundings. it is represented by Roman Numerals, with Intensity I being the weakest and Intensity X the strongest. It is used since 1996, replacing the Rossie-Forel Scale.Ground shaking hazard data is from PhIVolcS 2008, Administrative boundary is from National Statistics Office (NSO) 2000, and, Topographic map 2:50,000 scale is from national Mapping and Resource Information Authority (NAMRIA). The Ground Shaking Hazard map was acquired from the Hazards Mapping and assessment for Effective Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (READY) Project through PhIVolcS.Available in JPG and PDF, this map may be downloaded and used for free provided that: a.) no alterations are made to the map; b.) proper citations be referred to the sources mentioned above; and, c.) all logos appearing on the map should also appear on your document.
Bohol Liquefaction Hazard Map.jpg
Bohol Liquefaction Hazard Map.jpg
The Liquefaction Hazard Map shows areas susceptible to liquefaction categorized as follows: High, Moderate, and, Low Susceptibility. The map was based on the geology, presence of active faults, historical accounts of liquefaction, geomorphology and hydrology of the area and preliminary microtremor survey data utilized to validate type of underlying materials.Soil liquefaction occurs when, because of the shaking during an earthquake, water-saturated granular materials (such as sand) temporarily loses its strength and transforms from solid to liquid. Soil liquefaction may cause rigid structures, like buildings and bridges, to tilt or sink into the liquefied deposit. (Wikipedia)This map is semi-detailed and may be used for land use, emergency response and mitigation planning, and should not be used for site specific evaluation. The liquefaction hazard map do not restrict construction of any structures and development in areas susceptible to liquefaction as long as proper engineering considerations are applied.The hazard data is acquired from Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PhIVolcS) 2008. Administrative boundary is from National Statistics Office (NSO), 2000. Topographic map 1:50,000 scale is from the National Mapping and Resource Information Authority (NAMRIA). This Liquefaction Hazard Map is acquired from the Hazards Mapping and Assessment for Effective Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (READY) Project through PhIVolcS.Available in JPG and PDF, this map may be downloaded and used for free provided that: a.) no alterations are made to the map; b.) proper citations be referred to the sources mentioned above; and, c.) all logos appearing on the map should also appear on your document.
Bohol Rain-Induced Landslide Hazard Map.jpg
Bohol Rain-Induced Landslide Hazard Map.jpg
The Rain-Induced Landslide Hazard Map shows areas’ susceptibility to landslide caused by rain. Susceptibility classification includes: High, Moderate, Low Susceptibilities, and, Possible Areas prone to Landslide Accumulation.Areas with low to gentle slopes and lacking tension cracks have low landslides susceptibility rating. Areas with moderate susceptibility rating have inactive/old landslides and tension cracks which are located away the community. These areas usually have moderate slopes. Areas with high landslides susceptibility rating have active/recent landslides and tension cracks that would directly affect the community. Those with steep slopes and drainage that are prone to landslides damming are also high susceptibility to landslides. The possible landslides debris accumulation zones are the area where landslides debris could accumulate.The Rain-Induced Landslide Map is acquired from the Hazards Mapping and Assessment for Effective Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (READY) Project through the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PhIVolcS). The Hazard Data in the map is from the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR), Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB) 2008, Administrative boundaries from the National Statistics Office (NSO) 2000, and, the Topographic Map 1:50,000 scale is from the National Mapping and Resource Information Authority (NAMRIA).Available in JPG and PDF, this map may be downloaded and used for free provided that: a.) no alterations are made to the map; b.) proper citations be referred to the sources mentioned above; and, c.) all logos appearing on the map should also appear on your document.
Bohol Storm Surge Hazard Map.jpg
Bohol Storm Surge Hazard Map.jpg
The Storm Surge Hazard Map shows areas of different inundations categorized as: 1-meter surges; 1-meter to 4-meter surges; and, 4-meter to 12-meter surges. The inundation coverage is estimated based on geomorphologic analysis and observation in the areas during interviews or surveys. The surge heights are computed. using the data gathered during the surveys in reference to the significant tropical cyclone occurrences and from storm surge model results.A storm surge is an offshore rise of water associated with a low pressure weather system, typically tropical cyclones and strong extratropical cyclones. Storm surges are caused primarily by high winds pushing on the ocean's surface. The wind causes the water to pile up higher than the ordinary sea level. Low pressure at the center of a weather system also has a small secondary effect, as can the bathymetry of the body of water. It is this combined effect of low pressure and persistent wind over a shallow water body which is the most common cause of storm surge flooding problems. (Wikipedia)The tsunami hazard data is from Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), 2008. Administrative boundary is from the National Statistics Office (NSO), 2000, and the Topographic Map 1:50,000 scale is from the National Mapping and Resource Information Authority (NAMRIA). The Storm Surge Hazard Map was acquired from the Hazards Mapping and Assessment for Effective Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (READY) Project through the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PhIVolcS).Available in JPG and PDF, this map may be downloaded and used for free provided that: a.) no alterations are made to the map; b.) proper citations be referred to the sources mentioned above; and, c.) all logos appearing on the map should also appear on your document.
Bohol Tsunami Hazard Map.jpg
Bohol Tsunami Hazard Map.jpg
A tsunami is a series of water waves caused by the displacement of a large volume of a body of water, typically an ocean or a large lake. Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other underwater explosions (including detonations of underwater nuclear devices), landslides, glacier calvings, meteorite impacts and other disturbances above or below water all have the potential to generate a tsunami.Tsunami waves do not resemble normal sea waves, because their wavelength is far longer. Rather than appearing as a breaking wave, a tsunami may instead initially resemble a rapidly rising tide, and for this reason they are often referred to as tidal waves. Tsunamis generally consist of a series of waves with periods ranging from minutes to hours, arriving in a so-called "wave train". Wave heights of tens of meters can be generated by large events. Although the impact of tsunamis is limited to coastal areas, their destructive power can be enormous and they can affect entire ocean basins; the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was among the deadliest natural disasters in human history with over 230,000 people killed in 14 countries bordering the Indian Ocean. (Wikipedia)This Tsunami Hazard Map shows areas that may be affected in the event of a tsunami. This tsunami hazard map was generated using available tsunami programs, earthquake and tectonic data, and topographic and bathymetric maps.Some limitations to this map needs proper consideration and as follows: (1) The extent of tsunami inundation is based on current physical conditions of the study area; (2) Does not reflect the hazard that could be generated by far-field tsunami; (3) Earthquake-induced submarine landslides that could also generate tsunami are not covered by this map, and, (4) Significant erosion or deposition along the shore in the future could affect the level of tsunami hazard and may need hazard reassessment.The tsunami hazard data is from the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PhIVolcS), the Administrative boundary is from the National Statistics Office (NSO) 2000, and, the Topographic Map 1:50,000 scale is from the National Mapping and Resource Information Authority (NAMRIA). This Tsunami Hazard Map was acquired from the Hazards Mapping and Assessment for Effective Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (READY) Project through (PhIVolcS).Available in JPG and PDF, this map may be downloaded and used for free provided that: a.) no alterations are made to the map; b.) proper citations be referred to the sources mentioned above; and, c.) all logos appearing on the map should also appear on your document.

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